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Parishes: H (castles)

Harewood: Elvastone motte

Historic Environment Record reference no. 5776, Ordnance Survey grid reference: SO 5240 2830

Elvastone may be a modern form of Elvareston, which may have meant "Aelfhere's estate". Harewood most probably comes from the Old EnglishHarewuda, "hare wood". (Bruce Coplestone-Crow, Herefordshire Place-Names, British Archaeological Reports British Series 214, 1989, p. 96)

Harewood is 2km to the south of Hereford, on the A49. It is suggested that there is a low-level moated site at Elvastone, 0.7km south of the disused church of St. Denis. This area has since been ploughed out and there are no visible signs of such a site on the surface.

Hentland: motte and bailey

HER no. 6415, OS grid ref: SO 5380 2420

In The Text of the Book of Llan Dâv (Old Welsh Texts) Hentland is known as Hennlann, which means "old church" (Bruce Coplestone-Crow, Herefordshire Place-Names, British Archaeological Reports British Series 214, 1989, p. 98).

This motte and bailey site has been much altered and defaced by modern cottages and gardens, however some basic outlines can still be seen.

The enclosure covers c. 0.75 acres with traces of a bank to the north-west and south-west sides. The surrounding ditch survives best on the south-west side, where the outer scarp is rock cut, up to 16m wide and 1.5m deep.

The bailey is c. 50m square, and the motte is located on its north corner.

The motte has a diameter of approximately 26m; it is difficult to be certain of its dimensions as it has been cut away on the south side. The motte still stands to 2.5m on the north side.

Humber: In Castle Croft, Stoke Prior

HER no. 30482, OS grid ref: SO 5190 5610

According to the Woolhope Naturalists' Field Club's Field Survey there is a field name of "In Castle Croft" marked on the tithe map for Humber parish. This field is adjacent to one called "Calders Grave".

There are no indications of earthworks now present at this site.

Huntington: mound, south of church

HER no. 942, OS grid ref: SO 2478 5159

The name Huntington means "huntsmen's estate". Part of Huntington was in the Welshry of the Marcher lordship of Kington and the other part was in the Englishry. (Bruce Coplestone-Crow, Herefordshire Place-Names, British Archaeological Reports British Series 214, 1989, p. 108)

On the south side of the parish, a mound occupies a slight knoll. This mound is oval in form, 40m across and rising 2.7m above the surrounding ground.

The feature is very indistinct but traces of a sunken, almost rectangular, area can be determined on the south-east side adjacent to the mound.

At the time of the Domesday Survey in 1086 Earl Harold held Huntington.

Huntington: Turret Castle

HER no. 945, OS grid ref: SO 2590 5340

Occupying the base of a spur of Hell Wood running to the east, just over ½ mile east of the church, are the remains of a motte and bailey associated with the nearby Huntington Castle.

The motte is circular, c. 50m in diameter and rising c. 9m above the bottom of the ditch between it and the bailey. There is an irregular-shaped bailey to the east.

The bailey has remains of a rampart and ditch between it and the spur to the east. The entrance to the bailey is also on this side.

A badger sett has revealed part of the foundations of a wall, 5ft-6ft thick, which points to the existence of a shell keep. Around the site there are also buried and partly-exposed lengths of the curtain wall.

There is an outer bailey on the point of the ridge with possible foundations of a gatehouse. There do not appear to be any flanking towers; these were not necessary as it is a strongly defended ridge site.

The castle is thought to be 11th-12th century, and may even be a forerunner of nearby Huntington Castle.

Huntington: Turret Tump

HER no. 943, OS grid ref: SO 2465 5208

The name Huntington means "huntsmen's estate". Part of Huntington was in the Welshry of the Marcher lordship of Kington and the other part was in the Englishry. (Bruce Coplestone-Crow, Herefordshire Place-Names, British Archaeological Reports British Series 214, 1989, p. 108)

This site is on top of a 900ft knoll, nearly one mile south of Huntington parish church. Turret Tump is around 1¼ miles south of Huntington Castle and around 1¼ miles south-west of Turret Castle.

The site consists of a roughly circular mound with a diameter of 86ft at the base and rising 16ft. There is evidence of a ditch and outer bank on the south side of the site.

The motte is large enough to have supported a round or polygonal tower, although no evidence has been found for one.