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Timeline

55 & 54 BC: Julius Caesar invades Britain. Problems elsewhere in the Empire force him to turn back.

AD 43: Claudius invades Britain.
 
AD 60: Roman invasion of the Druid sanctuary on Anglesey.
 
AD 61: Queen Boudicca of the Iceni tribe rebels and burns Colchester. 80,000 Britons killed. Boudicca poisons herself.
 
AD 70s: Governors Julius Frontinus and Julius Agricola are successful in gaining control in Wales.
 
AD 79: Agricola marches into Caledonia (Scotland).
 
AD 84: The battle of Mons Graupius in Scotland. Agricola defeats the Scottish tribes. 
 
AD 122: Hadrian's Wall is constructed in the North to act as a border between the conquered and unconquered. It runs from coast to coast between Bowness in the west and Wallsend in the east.
 
AD 142: The Antonine Wall is constructed to the north of Hadrian's Wall to again act as frontier control. It runs across the Forth-Clyde isthmus from Old Kilpatrick in the west to Carriden in the east.
 
AD 280 onwards:  Forts are built on the south and east coasts to guard against raids by Saxon pirates.
 
AD 286: Carausius, Commander of the British Fleet, seizes Britian and declares himself Emperor.
 
AD 296: Roman troops land to reclaim Britain.
 
AD 367: Picts, Scots and Allocotti tribes all invade Britain at once. The Roman army loses control and General Theodosius is sent in to try and restore order.
 
AD 383: The British Commander, Magnus Maximus, declares himself Emperor and takes most of the army from Britain.
 
AD 398: Barbarian tribes invade Britain again.
 
AD 406: Roman troops in Britain elect their own Emperor. However, so many German invaders have crossed the River Rhine into neighbouring Gaul that Britain is now cut off from Rome. The last Roman soldiers in Britain are sent to Gaul to deal with the Germans.
 
AD 410: The Emperor Honorius issues an edict that gives all the cities in Britain responsibility for their own defence. Roman Britain has come to an end.
 
[Original compiler: Miranda Greene, 2004]